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Manifests

In short, the Manifest shall contain specific or arbitrary metadata that is useful to any provider or client, as well as be responsible for loading any additional providers into the provider repository.

To introduce metadata into the manifest repository, all one must do is implement the empty Zend_Tool_Framework_Manifest_Interface, and provide a getMetadata() method which shall return an array of objects that implement Zend_Tool_Framework_Manifest_Metadata.

<?php
interface Zend_Tool_Framework_Manifest_Interface
{
    public function 
getMetadata();
}

Metadata objects are loaded (by a loader defined below) into the Manifest Repository (Zend_Tool_Framework_Manifest_Repository). Manifests will be processed after all Providers have been found to be loaded into the provider repository. This shall allow Manifests to create Metadata objects based on what is currently inside the provider repository.

There are a few different metadata classes that can be used to describe metadata. The Zend_Tool_Framework_Manifest_Metadata is the base metadata object. As you can see by the following code snippet, the base metadata class is fairly lightweight and abstract in nature:

<?php
class Zend_Tool_Framework_Metadata_Basic
{

    protected 
$_type        'Global';
    protected 
$_name        null;
    protected 
$_value       null;
    protected 
$_reference   null;

    public function 
getType();
    public function 
getName();
    public function 
getValue();
    public function 
getReference();
    
/** ... */
}

There are other built in metadata classes as well for describing more specialized metadata: ActionMetadata and ProviderMetadata. These classes will help you describe in more detail metadata that is specific to either actions or providers, and the reference is expected to be a reference to an action or a provider respectively. These classes are described in the following code snippet.

<?php
class Zend_Tool_Framework_Manifest_ActionMetadata
    
extends Zend_Tool_Framework_Manifest_Metadata
{

    protected 
$_type 'Action';
    protected 
$_actionName null;

    public function 
getActionName();
    
/** ... */
}

class 
Zend_Tool_Framework_Manifest_ProviderMetadata
    
extends Zend_Tool_Framework_Manifest_Metadata
{

    protected 
$_type 'Provider';
    protected 
$_providerName  null;
    protected 
$_actionName    null;
    protected 
$_specialtyName null;

    public function 
getProviderName();
    public function 
getActionName();
    public function 
getSpecialtyName();
    
/** ... */
}

'Type' in these classes is used to describe the type of metadata the object is responsible for. In the cases of the ActionMetadata, the type would be 'Action', and conversely in the case of the ProviderMetadata the type is 'Provider'. These metadata types will also include additional structured information about both the "thing" they are describing as well as the object (the getReference()) they are referencing with this new metadata.

In order to create your own metadata type, all one must do is extend the base Zend_Tool_Framework_Manifest_Metadata class and return these new metadata objects via a local Manifest class or object. These user based classes will live in the Manifest Repository

Once these metadata objects are in the repository, there are then two different methods that can be used in order to search for them in the repository.

<?php
class Zend_Tool_Framework_Manifest_Repository
{
    
/**
     * To use this method to search, $searchProperties should contain the names
     * and values of the key/value pairs you would like to match within the
     * manifest.
     *
     * For Example:
     *     $manifestRepository->findMetadatas(array(
     *         'action' => 'Foo',
     *         'name'   => 'cliActionName'
     *         ));
     *
     * Will find any metadata objects that have a key with name 'action' value
     * of 'Foo', AND a key named 'name' value of 'cliActionName'
     *
     * Note: to either exclude or include name/value pairs that exist in the
     * search criteria but do not appear in the object, pass a bool value to
     * $includeNonExistentProperties
     */
    
public function findMetadatas(Array $searchProperties = array(),
                                  
$includeNonExistentProperties true);

    
/**
     * The following will return exactly one of the matching search criteria,
     * regardless of how many have been returned. First one in the manifest is
     * what will be returned.
     */
    
public function findMetadata(Array $searchProperties = array(),
                                 
$includeNonExistentProperties true)
    {
        
$metadatas $this->getMetadatas($searchProperties,
                                         
$includeNonExistentProperties);
        return 
array_shift($metadatas);
    }
}

Looking at the search methods above, the signatures allow for extremely flexible searching. In order to find a metadata object, simply pass in an array of matching constraints via an array. If the data is accessible through the Property accessor (the getSomething() methods implemented on the metadata object), then it will be passed back to the user as a "found" metadata object.

Zend Framework