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Book Review: aoCode Simplicitya

Note: This article was originally published at Planet PHP on 17 April 2012.
Planet PHP

Last night I finished my latest read from O'Reiily, Code Simplicity - The Science of Software Development. I spotted the book the other day when O'Reilly was running a special on a few books and the ebook was cheap so I figured it couldn't hurt to give it a try. After all, the aosciencea part in the title made it sound like there might be some hidden truths that could be applied anywhere in development. Unfortunately, most of the book just ended up being more of a rambling journey though things that most software developers that have any years of experience (even the bad ones) would already know.

The author spent a good bit of the book dedicated to definitions and explanations about various practices and ideas in development, as if he thought that maybe the audience reading the book wasn't savvy on the topic. The first few chapters also included several sections about the book itself - why it was relevant and mentions of a aosciencea that never seemed to fully resolve. Granted, trying to make a aosciencea (more a set of laws than just best practices) out of something so varied as software development is a pretty difficult task, but I felt like the author tried a little too hard to make his case for the book and less time actually defining something that could have been interesting.

All this being said, if you don't worry too much about him trying to propose a aosciencea to it all, there were some good best practices reminders in here for developers of any language:

  • Don't rewrite, rework - a reminder that, despite it seeming easier to chuck the whole system and start over with the knowledge you now have, you'd do better in the long run to change things from the inside out, a piece at a time (hint: unit tests make a world of difference here)
  • Know the problem before writing the solution - listen and understand the problem before you start with even one piece of code. If you don't fully understand the problem, you'll end up with half-assed software that only does part of what was needed.
  • Think specific, not general - if you immediately jump to the aowell, if I use a plugin architecture for this partaa chances are you've already added too much complexity. Think small first - make it work, then make it better (I'm a big fan of iterative development)
  • Use more experienced developers as a sounding board - chances are, if someone's been in the development biz longer than you, they've come across your situation before. Sometimes you have to seek out that person on a specific topic, but don't just forge ahead blindly. At the very least, try to find blog posts or articles that you can use as a guide.
  • Don't forget that time is important too - most developers (me included) easily forget that time is a factor in their development. No, I'm not talking about the actual time to write the code or the looming deadline to finish it by. I'm talking more about the time you'll need to do research, try things out or even consult with fellow developers. Time put into something to gain knowledge is an investment tooadon't forget to remember the value of it.

There were other points made throughout the book, some more relevant than others, but I wish the author had spent less time focusing on definitions and more on expanding the sections with some more practical advice. This (relatively short) book probably could have been summed up in a small series of blog posts and been just fine.

Book: Code Simplicity - The Science of Software Development
Publisher: O'Reilly
Author: Max Kanat-Alexander
Pages: 92